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"The Soil-Plant-Microbe Dance"

,Micaela Tosi et al (2020)

 

A diverse and balanced soil microbial community is crucial for maintaining soil health and ecosystem functioning.

 

AminoA biostimulant products support micro-organisms in the soil and the plant and may be applied to plants or soils as complimentary to crop nutrition and protection. All in all, to improve crop vigour, yields, quality and tolerance of abiotic stresses.

 

There are several beneficial groups of soil microorganisms that play important roles in soil health and ecosystem functioning. These groups of soil microorganisms mutually intersect with each other and with plants to form complex soil food webs:


Bacteria

Decomposition: Bacteria break down organic matter, releasing nutrients and contributing to nutrient cycling in the soil.

 

Nitrogen fixation: Certain bacteria, such as rhizobia, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that plants can use, thereby enhancing soil fertility.

 

Disease suppression: Some bacteria have the ability to suppress plant pathogens, protecting plants from diseases.

 

Plant growth promotion: Certain bacteria can produce plant growth-promoting substances, such as hormones and enzymes, that enhance plant growth and development.


Fungi

Decomposition: Fungi are efficient decomposers, breaking down complex organic matter and releasing nutrients into the soil.

 

Mycorrhizal associations: Many fungi form symbiotic associations with plant roots, known as mycorrhizae. These associations, enhanced using biostimulants comprised of mycorrhiza, improve nutrient uptake, particularly phosphorus, and stimulate improved plant growth and health.

 

Disease suppression: Like bacteria, some fungi also have the ability to suppress plant pathogens.

 

Soil structure formation: Fungal hyphae can bind soil particles together, improving soil structure and water infiltration.


Protozoa

Predation: Protozoa feed on bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms, regulating their populations and contributing to nutrient cycling.

 

Nutrient cycling: Protozoa release nutrients through their feeding activities, making them available for plant uptake.

 

Soil structure formation: Protozoa can contribute to soil aggregation and structure formation through their movement and feeding activities.


Actinomycetes

Decomposition: Actinomycetes are known for their ability to decompose complex organic matter, such as cellulose and lignin. They contribute to the breakdown of plant residues and the release of nutrients into the soil.

 

Antibiotic production: Actinomycetes are prolific producers of antibiotics, which can help suppress the growth of plant pathogens and protect plants from diseases.

 

Nitrogen cycling: Some actinomycetes are involved in nitrogen cycling processes, such as nitrification and denitrification. They contribute to the availability and cycling of nitrogen in the soil.

 

Soil structure formation: Actinomycetes can contribute to soil aggregation and structure formation through the production of sticky substances, improving soil structure and water infiltration.


Ciliates

Nutrient cycling: Ciliates play roles in nutrient cycling and organic matter decomposition in soil ecosystems.

 

Predation: Ciliates feed on bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms, regulating their populations and contributing to nutrient cycling.

 

Soil structure formation: Ciliates can contribute to soil aggregation and structure formation through their movement and feeding activities.